Poisonous plants

Epi4Dogs Foundation Inc.’s mission is the advancement of science and education relating to EPI (Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency), yielding useful insights and positive outcomes in better managing EPI in dogs and cats. Our goals are to support and/or collaborate with veterinary EPI research and researchers, and to promote EPI awareness by educating the general public, pet owners, pet organizations, rescue and shelter organizations, veterinary schools and veterinarians.
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Jean
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Location: South Liverpool
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Pet name: Kara, lost 10th May 2019
My name: Jean

Poisonous plants

Post by Jean » 01 May 2020, 13:46

30 April 2020

It’s safe to say that dogs are naturally curious creatures and when it comes to walking them, you can expect to make many stops along the way for them to sniff and explore their surroundings. But not everything they explore will be harmless. Whilst plants and flowers may be sweet-smelling, there some that could be harmful for your pet.

Whether you are getting out for your daily walk, or are spending extra time in the garden, spring-blooms are impossible to escape. In this guide we list some of the most common plants and flowers that are poisonous to dogs so that you know which ones to stay away from whilst you explore the outdoors.
Bluebells

The beautiful bluebell may be a great addition to your flower beds at home but this is one of the deadliest plants to have around if you are a pet-owner. Any part of the bluebell can be harmful for your dog and can even be deadly if eaten in large amounts. So it goes without saying that this is one to avoid at all costs. Side effects of your pooch nibbling on this springtime favourite include abdominal problems, diarrhoea and vomiting, and the function of the heart can also be affected.
Daffodils

Daffodils are one of the most popular and common spring-flowering bulbs. They bloom year after year, growing well in containers, borders and grass. Whilst these sunshine-yellow blooms look pretty in the home, they are poisonous to pups. If your pooch manages to eat one of the bulbs, this can cause them to feel really ill with symptoms including vomiting, convulsion and diarrhoea.
Deadly nightshade (belladonna)

Now, the name for this one is a bit of a giveaway. Deadly nightshade, also known as Atropa belladonna, is a poisonous plant for both dogs and humans. Eating this particular plant has a whole host of side effects from rashes to problems with balance and, in serious cases, can even lead to hallucinations and convulsions.
Hemlock

Hemlock is a highly poisonous plant of the parsley family, which is often found growing on riverbanks. Recognisable with its fern-like leaves, small white flowers and unpleasant smell, Hemlock not only causes vomiting when eaten but in severe cases, can paralyse the lungs.
Rhubarb

Despite being wonderfully tasty and flavoursome when used in a homemade crumble or pie, Rhubarb is a plant which poses harm to your dog. Whilst the stems are safe to eat, rhubarb leaves can be poisonous to dogs. Whilst it would take quite a few leaves to be consumed before resulting in sickness, eating too much rhubarb could cause the kidneys to shut down. Be mindful of this if you grow rhubarb in your garden and watch out for rhubarb patches on your morning walk.
Wisteria

This seasonal lilac bloom is one of the most common and most beautiful plants, which can be found in the garden, in the countryside and
Just a heads up


roaming in neighbouring fields. Whilst easy on the eye - and a winner for your instagram feed - Wisteria is incredibly toxic to dogs, cats and horses when eaten.
Yew

This common evergreen is extremely poisonous to all species, including dogs, cats, horses and humans! From the berries to the leaves, all parts of this plant are poisonous as they contain taxines.

If your dog was to digest any part of the yew, side effects could include dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, drooling, tremors, vomiting, weakness and life-threatening changes in heart rate or blood pressure. In extreme cases, this poisonous plant could result in a coma or death.

Like all toxic substances, the severity of the side effects will depend on how much of the plant your dog has digested. Some plants are more poisonous than others and so even a small amount could cause severe signs. If you suspect that your dog has eaten something poisonous, we suggest that you seek veterinary help as soon as possible.

Whilst this list is by no means exhaustive, these are some of the most common plants and flowers which could be poisonous to dogs and are best to avoid.


Jean

Forum Director
My name is Jean we live in Liverpool in Uk

My Kara born 21 July 2009 diagnosed with EPI by cTLI test August 2010 TLI = <1...folate 14 Cobalamin 408, shot down to 94, b12 injections every other day

Lowest weight 39 pounds

We used Panzym enzymes, Tylan and Chemeyes b12 capsules

Sadly, on 10th May 2019, we lost her to DM


Jeanx

Barb
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Posts: 472
Country: United States
State: New Jersey

Re: Poisonous plants

Post by Barb » 01 May 2020, 15:08

Thank You, Jean. A very good reminder. I had forgotten some of these plants. Thanks for posting.

Barb

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Olesia711
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Location: North Carolina
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State: North Carolina
Pet name: Izzy

Re: Poisonous plants

Post by Olesia711 » 01 May 2020, 20:07

Thanks Jean, that was a very good read and good for everyone to be aware of with Spring here and folks planting!!!!
Olesia, was owned by Izzy, a 35lb Spanish Water Dog (SWD), Diagnosed at 1.5 years old - TLI results 1.. Izzy passed away on February 13, 2020 at 15 years old. She lived with EPI for 13+1/2 years. It was because of Izzy that Epi4Dogs was started... she was the inspiration. May her legacy of helping others with EPI continue for as long as needed.........

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jilbert57
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Re: Poisonous plants

Post by jilbert57 » 01 May 2020, 20:12

We have stingy nettles on our property that sting the skin as well as are poisonous when ingested. Thanks Jean
My name is Jill and I live on the Hood Canal in Washington State. I have two dogs: Kiya is an aussie/blue heeler and is 13, TJ is a 4 year old Jack Russell. They keep me on my toes.
Mickey and his pancreatitis brought me to Epi4dogs.com site in 2012 to help manage it.

Mickey, Jack Russell. Chronic Pancreatitis. Dianes enzymes, 1/8t 3x/day with meals.
6/1999 - 8/2014

Jordan11
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Country: Ukraine
Pet name: Tess
My name: Jordan

Re: Poisonous plants

Post by Jordan11 » 09 Jun 2020, 04:33

Thanks for your remind! I love plants, and sometimes I forget that they can be harmful.
In my country, there is one celebration, and people put some green plants all over the apartment( on the flour). I decided not to do that this year because of my Tess, I only put it in one room. Somehow she ate a small piece of that, and this night she got sick.
So, it was a good lesson for me

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Olesia711
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Posts: 1255
Location: North Carolina
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State: North Carolina
Pet name: Izzy

Re: Poisonous plants

Post by Olesia711 » 09 Jun 2020, 09:33

It's amazing how a little tiny nibble of some plants can make a dog so very sick.... glad that Jean posted this article. Very helpful!
Olesia, was owned by Izzy, a 35lb Spanish Water Dog (SWD), Diagnosed at 1.5 years old - TLI results 1.. Izzy passed away on February 13, 2020 at 15 years old. She lived with EPI for 13+1/2 years. It was because of Izzy that Epi4Dogs was started... she was the inspiration. May her legacy of helping others with EPI continue for as long as needed.........

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